ABOUT US

The Shelley originally began life as a hotel and was converted into a care home in 2005. Over the years it has developed and built a reputation for being one of the best care home’s in the area, if not in the country with its sophisticated décor and excellence in care. The Shelley has strong links with the local community which we believe is important to the wellbeing of the residents in their daily lives and their own connection with the local community.

The Shelley was purchased by the Bown family in July 2020 and is their second home alongside Place Farm House in Brighton. They take a highly active role in the day-to-day running of the home to ensure its values and high quality service transcend everything we do.

The running of The Shelley is a team effort and our fabulous staff are the care and service we provide. Their team work and desire to do the best for the residents make our reputation and with close support, ensures we are rated as one of the best home's in the South East. 

View our GDPR policy

The Shelley, Worthing

 

  • Family run home with unique character and homely surroundings.
  • Awarding winning care home from carehome.co.uk
  • Outstanding and experienced care team who have the desire to provide the best for our residents.
  • En-suite bedrooms furnished to create a homely and cosy retreat for your loved one
  • Comprehensive diary of daily activities and professional entertainers.
  • Beautiful grounds and gardens for residents to enjoy at their leisure
  • Home cooked delicious food choices.
  • Services such as weekly Hairdressing, Chiropody and Newspapers all included within the fees.

 

2020 award for being in the top 20 group care homes

The safety of our residents is of the paramount importance during the COVID 19 pandemic and we are continually adapting our policies in light of changing Government Guidelines. We understand that family would like to see their loved one's whilst in a care home and it is also important for the wellbeing of residents. We closed our doors to all but essential visitors on 8th March 2020, 15 days prior to the national lockdown began and re-opened to visiting in July 2020. During the summer of 2020 we allowed visiting in the gardens of The Shelley (social distancing applying) and in October 2020 we introduced a new mobile Perspex glass screen in the front door to allow families and relatives to see one another via appointment slots. This has proved successful to date, even during lockdown's. In March 2021, we opened up visiting to nominated visitors and re-opened fully to visitor in June 2021.

You can read our latest Visiting Policy here

COVID-19 Health Screening Questionnaire

Report a COVID-19 rapid lateral flow test result

History of The Shelley

The town of Worthing slowly expanded with the arrival of the railway opening in the town in November 1845. This opened up an opportunity for many more people to travel to the seaside other than Brighton. Development of the town gradually expanded to to the Gratwick Estate (including Shelley Road) and the large properties in the road were built between 1877 – 1884, in the classic vernacular style red bricks and tiles that you can still see today.

The first occupier of the building was a Crimean war veteran named Conell George Grant Gordon. The building was named Inkerman after the Battle of Inkerman in 1854 during the Crimean War and he lived in the building from 1903 - 1908.  Col. Gordon was an equerry and controller meaning an officer of the British Royal Household, assisting with matters for HH Prince and HRH Princess Christian of Schleswig-Holstein. He worked his way up the ranks in the British Military, having gained his rank of Col whilst serving in the Scots Guards. Col Grant died in 1921 and his grave can been seen at Heene Road Cemetery

In 1923, the property was purchased by a lady called Elizabeth Rosina Johnson and she transformed the building into a hotel which became known as The Inkerman Hotel. Elizabeth Johnson resided in the building until her death in 1946. In this time she moved the main entrance to the hotel via the large doors (where we have our dining room currently) and unsuccessfully tried to build a large garage on the side of the building.

Between 1946 and 1950 the Inkerman was renamed The Lantern. In April 1950, The Lantern, having been purchased by The Polio Fellowship and the Infantile Paralysis Fellowship, was reopened as a children’s holiday home by Air Chief Marshall Sir John Slessor.  It was chosen as a holiday home due to its location as a short stroll to both the sea front and town so ideal for children with mobility issues. The cost in 1951 of a week’s stay was 3-4 guinea’s

In 1967, a new entrance canopy was installed (where our front door is currently) and at the same time, a big extension took place at the back of the building fronting onto the garden. In 1990, an additional first floor extension was added on top of the 1967 extension and improvements to the lounge at the back were also made, where it was extended and sky lights added for more natural daylight to enter.  

Fast forwarding to 2003 and after 55 years, the British Polio Fellowship decided to sadly close and sell The Lantern due to lack of funding and demand. The Lantern was bought by Marlene and Keith Sanders in May 2005 and they converted it into The Shelley Residential Home that we know today. The first residents were welcomed in to The Shelley in December 2005. The Shelley was sold to the Bown family in July 2020.
 

The Shelley are regulated by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) who are the national inspectorate body in the United Kingdom. We are regularly inspected against their 5 key questions. You can view our current and past inspections below.

2022 inspection

2020 inspection

2018 inspection

2015 inspection

About us

The Shelley originally began life as a hotel and was converted into a care home in 2005. Over the years it has developed and built a reputation for being one of the best care home’s in the area, if not in the country with its sophisticated décor and excellence in care. The Shelley has strong links with the local community which we believe is important to the wellbeing of the residents in their daily lives and their own connection with the local community.

The Shelley was purchased by the Bown family in July 2020 and is their second home alongside Place Farm House in Brighton. They take a highly active role in the day-to-day running of the home to ensure its values and high quality service transcend everything we do.

The running of The Shelley is a team effort and our fabulous staff are the care and service we provide. Their team work and desire to do the best for the residents make our reputation and with close support, ensures we are rated as one of the best home's in the South East. 

View our GDPR policy

The Shelley, Worthing

Why Choose us?

 

  • Family run home with unique character and homely surroundings.
  • Awarding winning care home from carehome.co.uk
  • Outstanding and experienced care team who have the desire to provide the best for our residents.
  • En-suite bedrooms furnished to create a homely and cosy retreat for your loved one
  • Comprehensive diary of daily activities and professional entertainers.
  • Beautiful grounds and gardens for residents to enjoy at their leisure
  • Home cooked delicious food choices.
  • Services such as weekly Hairdressing, Chiropody and Newspapers all included within the fees.

 

2020 award for being in the top 20 group care homes

Virtual Tour
History of The Shelley

History of The Shelley

The town of Worthing slowly expanded with the arrival of the railway opening in the town in November 1845. This opened up an opportunity for many more people to travel to the seaside other than Brighton. Development of the town gradually expanded to to the Gratwick Estate (including Shelley Road) and the large properties in the road were built between 1877 – 1884, in the classic vernacular style red bricks and tiles that you can still see today.

The first occupier of the building was a Crimean war veteran named Conell George Grant Gordon. The building was named Inkerman after the Battle of Inkerman in 1854 during the Crimean War and he lived in the building from 1903 - 1908.  Col. Gordon was an equerry and controller meaning an officer of the British Royal Household, assisting with matters for HH Prince and HRH Princess Christian of Schleswig-Holstein. He worked his way up the ranks in the British Military, having gained his rank of Col whilst serving in the Scots Guards. Col Grant died in 1921 and his grave can been seen at Heene Road Cemetery

In 1923, the property was purchased by a lady called Elizabeth Rosina Johnson and she transformed the building into a hotel which became known as The Inkerman Hotel. Elizabeth Johnson resided in the building until her death in 1946. In this time she moved the main entrance to the hotel via the large doors (where we have our dining room currently) and unsuccessfully tried to build a large garage on the side of the building.

Between 1946 and 1950 the Inkerman was renamed The Lantern. In April 1950, The Lantern, having been purchased by The Polio Fellowship and the Infantile Paralysis Fellowship, was reopened as a children’s holiday home by Air Chief Marshall Sir John Slessor.  It was chosen as a holiday home due to its location as a short stroll to both the sea front and town so ideal for children with mobility issues. The cost in 1951 of a week’s stay was 3-4 guinea’s

In 1967, a new entrance canopy was installed (where our front door is currently) and at the same time, a big extension took place at the back of the building fronting onto the garden. In 1990, an additional first floor extension was added on top of the 1967 extension and improvements to the lounge at the back were also made, where it was extended and sky lights added for more natural daylight to enter.  

Fast forwarding to 2003 and after 55 years, the British Polio Fellowship decided to sadly close and sell The Lantern due to lack of funding and demand. The Lantern was bought by Marlene and Keith Sanders in May 2005 and they converted it into The Shelley Residential Home that we know today. The first residents were welcomed in to The Shelley in December 2005. The Shelley was sold to the Bown family in July 2020.
 

COVID 19

The safety of our residents is of the paramount importance during the COVID 19 pandemic and we are continually adapting our policies in light of changing Government Guidelines. We understand that family would like to see their loved one's whilst in a care home and it is also important for the wellbeing of residents. We closed our doors to all but essential visitors on 8th March 2020, 15 days prior to the national lockdown began and re-opened to visiting in July 2020. During the summer of 2020 we allowed visiting in the gardens of The Shelley (social distancing applying) and in October 2020 we introduced a new mobile Perspex glass screen in the front door to allow families and relatives to see one another via appointment slots. This has proved successful to date, even during lockdown's. In March 2021, we opened up visiting to nominated visitors and re-opened fully to visitor in June 2021.

You can read our latest Visiting Policy here

COVID-19 Health Screening Questionnaire

Report a COVID-19 rapid lateral flow test result

CQC reports

The Shelley are regulated by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) who are the national inspectorate body in the United Kingdom. We are regularly inspected against their 5 key questions. You can view our current and past inspections below.

2022 inspection

2020 inspection

2018 inspection

2015 inspection